What do with things died lonely Japanese

• What do with things dead single Japanese

What do with things died lonely Japanese

Jeonju Han (Jeongja Han) is ejected from the drawer handles and lighters in a plastic garbage bag, and its client, recently widowed woman 50 years old, sitting next to his chair and watches. The woman's husband had died a few weeks ago in a car accident, leaving her clean and spacious apartment in Tokyo with two bedrooms, in which they lived together for 30 years. The couple have no children, and anyone who could pass on things. Therefore, the client Khan instructions were simple - get rid of everything.

Khan directs cleaning company Tail Project, which specializes in cleaning and disposal of property of the deceased. Such services in Japan are becoming increasingly popular because of the country's population is aging and reduced. For Khan and her staff work is relatively simple. The four of them begin to work at 9 am, and the hour of the day a small truck will be completely filled. Next, they go to a company that outbids things, packs them on a ship and sent to new owners in the Philippines.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

Companies like Tail Project, have become extremely necessary in a country where every year more people die, and no one left who would they mourned. In 2017 born children 946 060 in Japan, and died 1340433 human. According to the experts, Japan's population could shrink by a third over the next 50 years, and the chances to rectify the situation are negligible.

The roots of the problem lie in the history of the country, specifically in the economic boom after World War II, which led to unprecedented levels of consumption in the always historically conservative Japan. And in the 90s the economic crisis, and the young Japanese, or just abandon the marriage and children, or put the family into the background, concentrating on making money. As a result, Japan is now in one of the oldest populations in the world that sits in houses full of expensive things, but without heirs. According to the association of cleaning professionals, services earn revenue in the year 4, 5 billion dollars.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

Khan (pictured) picks up a small brown cylinder - a personal seal, used as a signature in Japan, and shows the widow with the question of whether to leave. The widow replied: "No, thank you."

The contents of most of the houses actually carries little value, in addition to the emotional attachment to those who bought them. Kitchen utensils, usually goes for scrap, bath accessories, of course, can not be used again. Old CDs, books and media players are usually worthless, unless they are in perfect condition and not be interested collectors. Furniture, if not antique, too, becomes useless, especially if it is from IKEA.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

The idea of ​​a company Khan came in a similar niche when she was burying her mother. Then she was very busy and could not expect that other family members take care of the affairs and mother things. Khan says that thought, it would be good to hire someone that he helped with the cleaning and disposal. And in 2012 she opened Tail Project, and it is very time - a country just recovering from the earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

To open a cleaning business, Han had to be licensed dealer of second-hand goods and coroners to complete a full course of harvesting and processing remains. She can not stand the corpses of the apartments, but it is often necessary to clean up what's left after the corpses - fluids and hair.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

About 30 percent of the scope of cleaning services covers household cleaning, and sale of items remaining after the death of single people. About 20 percent - the house ghost, which the owners left to rot. The remainder is accounted for by relatives of the deceased. Sometimes they just come for valuables, and all the rest does not interest them.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

In the period from 2007 to 2016 more than 100 thousand Japanese companies received a license for the sale of used things. Professionals such as Han, produced from 2200 to 3200 dollars per working day. The amount may be more - it depends on the amount of work and time spent.

Under the market unnecessary things were arranged, many Japanese shops, taking the dead things. Some dealers are engaged in self-cleaning things and taken them to the stores for resale. even Buddhist monks involved in the business. Families turn to the monks and temples for comfort and prayers. And then the monks come and clean the house from things. Some cleaning companies work directly with the temples, where they can burn things during the ritual "extenuating".

What do with things died lonely Japanese

"Yahoo! Auctions "and similar services remain the most popular in the country such as sales outlets for" buyer for the buyer. "

The editor of the Japanese business publication The Reuse Business Journal Rina Hamada suggests that the mentality of the Japanese, who were always thrifty, had changed because of the post-war economic boom, a time when the birth rate has increased. "If you want to get the economy growing, then buy. And the Japanese have forgotten who they were, they just buy, buy and buy. "

What do with things died lonely Japanese

The consequences of 2011 sobered nation. The earthquake and tsunami changed the attitude of the Japanese to things. "We finally remembered who we once were. People started sending their belongings in the Tohoku region affected by the disaster. Because there was nothing, "not the people of Tohoku.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

Han points to a number of pots. "We collect them and sell mostly to dealers from Africa dollar apiece." But most things still go to the Philippines, where love and appreciate Japanese things.

What do with things died lonely Japanese

Reputation of products from Japan as the most high-quality extends even to second-hand goods. "Even if the thing was done in China, but has been used in Japan, people will think that it is good."

What do with things died lonely Japanese

However, Khan is confident that the Philippine market will not last long "people's welfare level is gradually increasing, and sooner or later they will want new things. This has already happened with Thailand, Japan, another favorite place for the sale of second-hand things. " Perhaps, then, the containers will be sent to Cambodia.