Forgotten Soviet translators

Very often, literary translators names are undeservedly forgotten. Everyone knows the names of the authors of works, but of those who produce their immortal works have become available not only carriers of their native language, not even remember. But there were among known interpreters and famous Soviet and Russian writers, and their translations are often the real masterpieces.

Forgotten Soviet translators

Samuil Marshak

Forgotten Soviet translators

The Russian poet started translating in his youth, and a 20-year old Samuel Marshak already published poems Hayim Nahman Bialik, which translated from Yiddish. Five years later, while traveling in the UK, Samuil became interested in British poetry and ballads began to translate into Russian. His translations differed simplicity and accessibility, although the poet himself said that this work can be attributed to high and very difficult art. He has over two hundred poems in Russian alone Burns. And he translated Shakespeare, Swift, Blake, Wordsworth, Byron and many more authors.

Korney Chukovsky

Forgotten Soviet translators

Korney Ivanovich liked American poet and essayist Walt Whitman and translated the works of the author throughout his life, first published his collection back in 1907. For more than 30 years' anarchist poet Walt Whitman "translated Chukovsky was issued 10 times. The special value of this work was that Chukovskij translation as close to the original, retaining even the rhythm and intonation of Whitman. In addition, a poet and prose translated more: Arthur Conan Doyle, O. Henry, Mark Twain and other writers.

Boris Pasternak

Forgotten Soviet translators

The famous poet knew French, German, English and Georgian languages. At a time when the Soviet authorities refused to release to the press of his own works, Romain Rolland Pasternak advised to do Shakespeare, and Vsevolod Meyerhold was able to convince him to prepare for the theater translation of "Hamlet." As a result, from the pen of the poet came to the translation of "Hamlet," "Romeo and Juliet," "Macbeth" and "King Lear." In addition to Shakespeare, Pasternak translated Baratashvili, Tabidze, Byron, Keats and others. His translations were not verbatim, but passed on the brightness of the image, character and emotions of the characters works.

Rita Wright-Kovaleva

Forgotten Soviet translators

Because of Rita Wright in Russian for the first time there were works of Jerome David Salinger, Kurt Vonnegut, Edgar Allan Poe, Franz Kafka, and yet many foreign writers. She could circumvent the strict censorship and poetry fill even the simplest description of the coffee shop. She spoke fluent French and German, and later added to them and the English. At the same time she translated both into Russian and German, in particular, the "Mystery-Bouffe" at the request of Vladimir Mayakovsky, she shifted back in '22. In the 1950s, it seized more and Bulgarian language.

Nora Gal

Forgotten Soviet translators

It is difficult to imagine, but Eleanor Halperin came on filfak 17 times and still became a student of the Pedagogical Institute named after Lenin in Moscow. The reason for the refusal were not failures in examinations. Just her father was hit by a roller of Stalinist repression, and the future well-known translator of immediately being labeled "the daughter of the enemy of the people". Her first published translations are works of Theodore Dreiser, HG Wells and Jack London. But her most famous work was "The Little Prince" Exupery. Thanks to Nora Gaal Soviet reader acquainted with the works of Dickens, Camus, Bradbury, Simak and other writers.

Marina Tsvetaeva

Forgotten Soviet translators

After returning from exile in the Soviet Union Marina Tsvetaeva herself almost did not write, but actively involved in transfers. She seemed to feel the mood and tone of the original work, and each row breathed vivid emotions. On account of Marina Tsvetaeva's translations of Federico García Lorca, of Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Weber Hersh, William Shakespeare, and even many foreign authors.

Anna Akhmatova

Forgotten Soviet translators

Russian poet knew several foreign languages ​​and worked with the works of French, Bulgarian, English, Portuguese, Korean, Italian, Greek, Armenian poets, as well as poems by authors from other countries. She did not like to translate a poet, but was forced to do it, when her own works completely stopped printing. Despite the fact that the poet was often criticized, not only as a writer but also as a translator, she was able to release several collections of poetry translation, including classical Chinese and Korean poetry.