Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Syrian woman who was driven toy turtle in Munich in his pocket, the girl who took her cat to a refugee camp Idomeni in Greece - all of whom had run away from home and country, asking: "What is so important to me that I I can not give it up? "

Photographer from Basel Gabriel Hill invited the refugees to his studio, where he usually does corporate portrait photo shoot, and asked them to bring the most important thing they took with them on the road to a safe place. As a rule, it appears that it is the only thing they took out of the house.

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Shirin, 21, fled from Afghanistan in 2010.

"I live in Switzerland for two years. My family could only pay for one ticket out of the country, so I'm here all alone. Living here is very expensive, so the family can not come here to me. When I left home, my father gave me a cell phone. This phone, and clothing that was on me, were the only things that I could take with them. With this mobile phone, I could contact relatives and let them know that I got safely. He also gave me the feeling that I am not alone. He became everything to me. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Seila, 33 years old, escaped from Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1992.

"When I was little, my father used to go to Africa for work. Once, when I was three years old, I asked him to bring me a live monkey, but he brought me a soft hare purchased during the transplant at the airport of Zurich. I wore everywhere with this hare. When the war started, everything happened so quickly that I could neither understand what is happening, or think about what she would like to take with me when we fled. So I forgot his rabbit when we left. Dad left, and I wrote him a bunch of letters, which was: "Have you found my bunny? I miss you! "I can not describe my feelings when I was three years old his father saw again later, in 1995. I was trembling all over when she saw his face at the airport in Zurich, and realized that he was holding my rabbit. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Tags, 27 years old, escaped from Iran in 2011.

"Five years ago, I had to leave Iran. I was able to take only what fits in a pocket of trousers. A few months later I came to Switzerland. Most of the way I did on foot. We constantly had to cross the river in a rubber boat. I took with me only three photos. Each reminds me of the different periods of life before I had to run, which left fond memories. I would take with them more things, if at that time I had a choice, but it was not. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Joseph, 20 years old, fled from Eritrea in 2014.

"Escape from Eritrea was quite long and exhausting. We had to go on for several days on foot, sit behind bars in several countries and cross one of the world's largest desert. However, we were lucky. All survived. I took a few dear to the heart of things, but I had to throw most of them to go through the desert, to take with you as many bottles of water as possible. I left a small notebook with telephone numbers and a few photos from my childhood. Telephone numbers were very important, because I was detained several times and had to pay a ransom to let me go. I was lucky that I have an uncle in the United States: he sent me money, and I could pay. Therefore, his phone number was the most important thing in my life. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Nazim, 26 years old, fled from Afghanistan in 2011.

"Five years ago, I had to get out of Afghanistan. There I was a police officer, but soon after I started working, I had to leave the country. With me was my backpack with personal belongings, but the traffickers were told to throw it away. The only thing I have left - a little book out of the police academy, and beads that I gave my mother. I always wanted to become a police officer. This little book - the only thing I have left from this dream. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Ahmet, 23, fled from Eritrea in 2013.

"I boarded a ship in Libya, which was to take us to Italy. I could not take anything with them except the clothes that was on me, and a small piece of paper with my family telephone. I was told to contact them as soon as I get to Italy. About halfway the ship rolled over and sank. Clothes got wet and became so severe that I had to remove it. She disappeared into the sea with a piece of paper with my family telephone. I survived, as well as another 200 people. More than 250 people from the ship sank. A few months after escaping from Eritrea, I found a man in Switzerland, who was able to contact my family. They thought that I had not survived the journey. This piece of paper with their number was the most important of my things. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

, Marie-Therese, 62, fled from the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2008.

"I had to run away from home at any moment. Unfortunately, I did not have time to take anything with them. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Rohullah, 24 years old, fled from Afghanistan in 2010.

"Five years ago I escaped from Afghanistan. When I left, I could not take anything with them except the clothes that was on me. I was very young when his father was killed, so I do not remember it. He always wore a gold chain around his neck, and after his death, my mother gave it to me. I independently came to Switzerland, and the chain - the only thing I have left from his family and homeland. It is for me very important, it gives me the feeling that I was not alone, as if the Pope is always with me. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Farhad, 27 years old, fled from Afghanistan in 2007.

"I picked up some things from the house, but carriers have told us all to throw. I did not have the heart to throw out the photo my mother, so I hid it under his clothes. I have not seen her mother since I left, so this picture of her very much to me. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Vinasithambi, 64 years old, escaped from Sri Lanka in 1984.

"I had to leave our home in Sri Lanka in 1984. Most of the road I walked on foot, but to get to Switzerland, I was getting on the boat, by plane and by train. I could not take anything with them except the clothes in which I was wearing. Since I had to leave his family there, these photos were the only things important to me, and luckily I was able to carry them myself. In the photos, my parents, my brother and my sister, who was already dead. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Migmar, aged 59, escaped from Tibet in 1959.

"In 1959, I was running with my father, mother, sister, grandparents from Tibet to India. Then I was two years old, even though I do not know on which day was born. I got to India only with the father, grandparents: we lost a sister and mother on the road. The most important things that we took with us, run, torches, lighting the way for us to move through the Himalayas. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Suleiman, 18, fled from Afghanistan in 2014.

"It took me almost nine months to get to Switzerland. I wanted to go on a ship from Turkey to Greece, but in Greece we are constantly catching coastal police and sent back. I tried five times, and once the boat capsized and sank. Of all the things I took with me, there was only this mobile phone. Mom bought it before I fled from Afghanistan. She spent it 3,000 afghanis (about $ 45). This is half of the monthly income of my family. The phone was the only way to tell my mother, on which I step of the way, and that I was all right. My mother was very worried, so I called periodically, and it is reassuring. The phone also gave me the opportunity to feel more secure and not feel so alone. "

Refugees and the most important things, which they took with them

Mahmoud, 20 years old, ran away from Lebanon in 2014.

"Actually, I'm Palestinian, but I ran away from Lebanon. Several years ago, I turned from Islam to Christianity, and the priest gave me this Bible. During the trip, the boat in which I sailed, was in trouble, and our master told us all thrown into the sea. Somehow I managed to hide my Bible. It's the most expensive thing to me, it gives me strength in difficult times. She soaked in sea water and is quite dirty, but I would not trade it for a new one. Here in Switzerland, I live in a shelter mainly Muslims. My family - the only people who know that I switched to another religion. So I can not show the face, I'm living a double life. "