Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

For centuries, the city of Ani was considered a cultural center. They ruled all the major civilizations of history, from the Byzantines to the Ottomans. Today, this eerie place, remains in the memory of travelers in this ghost town. Ani stands on a plateau in the remote mountainous areas of the north-east Turkey: Nothing materializes several stories of forgotten empires. Ghost Town, which still sad cry in his destruction of the walls and churches.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

The city walls

Rare visitors get here to enjoy the panoramic view of the ruins, whose history spans three centuries and five empires. Byzantines, Seljuks, Bagratids, Georgians and Turks ruled this city. After Russia's victory in the Russian-Turkish war (1877-1878 biennium), the city and the neighborhood went to the new Republic of Armenia, and in 1920 the region returned to Turkey.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

Ancient bridge across the river Akhuryan

For the territory of the ancient empire paid in blood. Ruins of the ancient bridge over the river Akhuryan mark the place where previously held the land border between Turkey and Armenia. Officially, it was closed in 1993: this was Turkey's response to the territorial conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

Save era

Archaeologists have to fight to preserve the remnants of the once great imperial city. The fact that tensions between Armenia and Turkey call into question the status of Ani - none of the parties does not allocate funds to rescue the sad, haunted ruins. Currently, historians have applied to include Ani as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but the debate on this is still going on.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

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City of a Thousand Churches

Scientists have calculated that in the XI century the population of Ani reached 100 000 people, a huge number of people at that time. Artistic rendering of everyday life at the time shows us the bustling medieval city, crowded houses, craft workshops and of course churches. Ani became famous as a city of a thousand and one churches today, archaeologists gradually dig out these amazing architectural ensembles from the ruins.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

The Underground City

Opposite the St. Gregory Church previously discovered, archaeologists found a series of caves carved into the rock. These strange dwellings were used as shelter by those who lacked funds for a house in the city. Most surprising is the fact that in the early XX century, many of these caves were inhabited.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

The frescoes on the walls of

Some of the churches have been preserved very well. For example, already mentioned above St. Gregory church is decorated with amazing frescoes depicting scenes from the life of Christ and St. Gregory the Illuminator. That little fact has enabled researchers to conduct in-depth research period. The fact that such detailed cycles of frescoes were not accepted in the Armenian art of the time. Most likely, we have opened the Georgian traditional painting.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

Islamic minarets

Around 1072 the Seljuk ceded control of Ani Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origin, shadaditam. They, in turn, left a mark on the city of their beliefs. Beautiful work of art stands the minaret manuchhirskoy mosque, built by the architect dangerously close to the edge of the cliff.

Ani: The Story of forgotten empires

Strengthening ghosts

Now it seems as if the city walls of Ani are ready to crumble from the lightest breeze. However, the fortifications were built in the X century and for many centuries they protected the imperial city from the siege of dozens of different armies. These shafts have witnessed bloody strife between Bagratids and Byzantines, Seljuks and the Byzantines.