What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow

• What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow

In XX century the development of aviation took place the most active. In just one century humanity has gone from the simplest to the most sophisticated gliders supersonic aircraft. Today, we just go to the first representative of Soviet jet aircraft, namely the question of why the Soviet aircraft on the nose needed was some weird cone.

What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow

The cone on the bow of the Soviet aircraft beginning of the second half of the XX century (such as the Su-17) - is a very important structural element. It is called "damping cone." The main function of this device is reduced to to retard the flow of air flowing at supersonic speed. This in turn is necessary for the power unit of the aircraft during the flight the machine was able to get enough oxygen.

What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow

The bottom line is that at supersonic speed airflow accelerates to Mach 2-3. This in turn results in a drastic reduction in engine power. To prevent this from happening conical fairing on the nose is brought forward or pushed back, depending on the current speed of the car. These cones are placed is not necessarily on the nose of the aircraft. The fairing is precisely where stands the engine (or engines).

What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow

form a cone fairing was dictated by aerodynamic performance. Moreover, inside the damping cowling is often set small radar station. However, in consequence of this design decision rejected since fairing dimensions become much reduced, and communication equipment size remained unchanged.

What Soviet aircraft structural member such as a cone at bow

Nowadays fairings are still used, but only a few (usually hypersonic) aircraft. Using a design solution not only in the USSR but also in other countries. For example, "cones" can be seen on the SR-71 American experimental aircraft engines.