Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

Nurses used in advertisements from the 19th century. Perhaps there is something in a caring and hardworking image profession that marketers and decided to present to the consumer. Coca-Cola in its advertising used nurses, who often flashed on posters for a leading soft drink company.

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

Quality you can trust

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

The poster with a pretty nurse, offering a glass of Coke, this ad AD 1950 is trying to portray Coca-Cola, as a reliable and useful way to quench your thirst. Coca-Cola was originally presented to the drink with medicinal properties. Drink started its life as the patented medicines, fixes many misfortunes, just as comprehensive as the problem of nerves, stomach disorders, addiction to morphine and impotence. In 1880 John pharmacist Pemberton created recipe prototype which contained alcohol and coca leaf (cocaine source). After the ban in Atlanta and Fulton County in 1886, Pemberton removed the alcohol and Coca-Cola has developed itself. I wonder what the cook was still the main active ingredient until 1903, when it was replaced by caffeine.

Coca-Cola workers at work keeps fresh!

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

The high sugar content in the Kohl led to reports that it is inherently "liquid candy." It has been repeatedly proven that there is a link between obesity and the consumption of Coca-Cola. But it is quite natural that the drink evokes a feeling of vitality due to its special composition.

The sign of good taste

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

The text in the top right corner of the ad states that "Clean, usefulness and quality helped to make Coca-Cola the most beloved drink in the world." This description, along with nurses, to promote the product, suggests that Coca-Cola - a healthy drink. The audience can take it even unconsciously, as if a nurse drink it, then it does not do anyone it's nothing wrong. However, recent studies have linked long-term consumption of soda with increased risk of osteoporosis, high blood pressure and kidney disease.

purity, usefulness, Coca-Cola quality

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

In advertising Coca-Cola has a long history. Some even mistakenly believe merit the drink formed the modern image of Santa Claus as an old man dressed in red and white. However, the original inventor of Coca-Cola, John Pemberton, as they say, there was little understanding of how to sell his product efficiently since its establishment in 1886. In fact, the secretary of the company on behalf of Pemberton Frank Mason Robinson invented the drink's name and wrote it in a graphic video Spencerian, still used on the package today. Robinson even invented the first spread of the slogan for the brand, "The pause that refreshes."

Something that will refresh you

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

Coca-Cola This advertising proudly claims that the product "is served at leading hospitals." It is alleged that the drink had met the approval of the best medical institutions in the United States that even recommended to drink it when feeling unwell. Starting as a patented drug, Coca-Cola has become one of the most well-known beverage in the world. At the moment, Coca-Cola holds 41 percent of the total share of the soft drinks market in the world. Sodas like Coca-Cola - a very powerful source of empty calories (those that lack nutritional value). Just one serving of cola contains about 240 kkalory - 10 percent of the RDA. And despite the fact that Coca-Cola is no longer present in school vending machines, replaced on juice, water and low-calorie drinks, the sale of sugary and high-calorie soda remains the foundation of the company's business.

Drink Coca-Cola

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

This is the story of one of the former nurses of those times: "I well remember when nurses had enough time to get out on the break and meet around the old machine Coca-Cola. You could get a bottle for 10 cents, and you had time to drink it completely before returning to work. "

Merci Bien

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

This vintage poster 1940s from Canada shows the smiling nurse with a bottle of Coca-Cola. The drink is associated with happiness and welcoming - it follows from the proposed slogans poster - "Merci Bien!"

... for a relaxed cheerfulness

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

This poster with the American army nurse serves as proof the fact that Coca-Cola has made considerable efforts to advertise itself during the Second World War. Indeed, as part of the advertising, launched a patriotic company, offering free drinks to the soldiers, that is also conveniently possible to avoid sugar normalizing laws. Operators companies are also allowed to be present on the front lines of the battle as "technicians" in spite of the fact that they rarely see the actual battle. Interestingly, the company was selling soft drinks and the other side. For example, Fanta was originally produced in Germany during the war. The recipe appeared due to problems with the Coca-Cola syrup imports into the country because of the restrictions on trade at the time.

Work with cheerfulness

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

In the modern world, nurses are still often used to sell products. Despite the fact that nowadays it is unlikely that Coca-Cola someone may be associated with a healthy lifestyle, doctors have recently discovered that a fizzy drink can be helpful for some types of indigestion. Probably, the reason is that the chemicals combined with bubbles, can help clear the stomach.

Do you trust its quality

Vintage Coca-Cola advertisement with nurses

This advertising in 1954 claims that Coca-Cola has in hospitals, shops and offices. And cheerful nurse accompanying text says that employees trust the brand of medicine. During 1950, considerable effort to promote Coca-Cola as a good beverage for people with active lifestyles. The period after the Second World War was one of the best for the international progress of the company, with the number of bottling plants around the world has increased by nearly 100 per cent of the mid-1940s to the 1960s. Interestingly, Coca-Cola was not the only use of nurses to promote their product: its main competitor, Pepsi, medrabotnits also used in advertisements.